Nuclear fallout

IN the 1960s 11 holes were blown into one of the country’s largest seagrass meadows.
Nanjing Night Net

It was at Hole in the Wall in Booderee National Park, when seismic testing was used to check ground stability for a proposed nuclear testing facility.

Nearly 50 years later, the holes are clearly visible on Google Earth and aren’t expected to grow back for another 100 years.

This week marine ecologist Dr Peter Macreadie will be taking sediment cores from the damaged areas and measuring the carbon loss from the area.

The Chancellor’s Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Technology Sydney, Dr Macreadie specialises in seagrass and its ability to store carbon.

Dr Macreadie will be joined by a team of technicians, a PHD student and a research assistant who together will be drilling into the seabed to take core samples.

Working from a large punt out of Murray’s Beach boat ramp the team will use a hydraulic pile driving system to hammer the seven metre aluminium sample tubes into the seabed.

Samples are then stored and returned to his laboratory for testing.

“Seagrass can store carbon for thousands of years. It’s 35 times more powerful than tropical rainforest and it’s an important natural way of slowing down climate change,” said Dr Macreadie.

However, seagrass is not included in the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, and Dr Macreadie would like to see this changed.

He expected an analysis of sediment from the Hole in the Wall cores to show a massive carbon loss and he hoped to use this data to have seagrass included in the inventory.

The National Greenhouse Gas Inventory measures greenhouse gas emissions produced by agriculture and industry, but failing to take into account the effect of seagrass loss is a huge error according to Dr Macreadie.

“People don’t realise the significance of seagrass – Australia’s lost 50 per cent since records began. If carbon is $23 per tonne, that’s $45 billion dollars.”

SEA SCIENCE: Dr Peter Macreadie (right) with PhD student Stacey Trevathan-Tackett, UTS research assistant Stacey Ong and technical officer Rod Hungerford will be taking sediment cores from seagrass beds in Jervis Bay this week.

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南京夜网 21/04/2019

Senseless torching hits family

IN THE early hours of Monday morning, Phillip Heir and his family didn’t stir as thieves quietly rolled his work ute and trailer out of his Tolland Heights driveway, only to take it to Jubilee Park and torch it.
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The random act of vandalism has left Mr Heir disgusted and his family without an income with the uninsured ute essential to his self-operated business, Aaron’s Hedging and Mowing.

“It’s just all so senseless,” Mr Heir said of the theft.

“They stole the ute so they could just take it to a sporting ground to burn it, which makes it useless to me and to them.”

The ute was locked at the time of the theft.

The trailer, which was loaded with gardening tools, was damaged but is repairable.

The setback comes after Mr Heir only started the small business in April, to support himself and his four children, keeping operating costs low by using the ’94 Mazda Bravo as his work truck.

“You work hard to branch out on your own, which is a big risk,” Mr Heir said of starting his business.

“I just want the people who did this to know what effect they have on other people; I work for what I’ve got.”

Due to a string of car thefts – four in the past five days – in the Central, Mount Austin and Tolland areas, police have reissued a warning to residents urging them to ensure their vehicles are locked and valuables aren’t left in the car.

“Police are urging people to lock their cars,” a spokeswoman said, also urging anyone with information about the incident to contact the station.

“Police would like to hear from anyone who may assist in identifying the people responsible for this crime.”

ROBBED OF AN INCOME: Phillip Heir inspects the remains of his torched ute yesterday, which was stolen and burnt out in the early hours of Monday morning. Picture: Addison Hamilton

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南京夜网 21/04/2019

Middy’s here to stay, say pubs

THE once-beloved middy glass may be disappearing from the shelves of pubs and clubs in Sydney, but it still enjoys its popularity among Wagga drinkers.
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William Farrer Hotel licensee David Barnhill reckons “about 20 per cent” of beers sold in his pub are served in middies and he doesn’t think the 285ml glass is dying out.

Though he does concede the 425ml schooner glass has become the powerhouse of the pub.

“Schooners have probably become more popular,” he said.

“Drinkers realise there’s better value for money in a schooner.”

The humble middy is popular with a wide cross-section of drinkers at the William Farrer Hotel, with Mr Barnhill among those appreciating the smaller glass.

But that popularity isn’t enjoyed everywhere, with Romano’s Hotel licensee Wayne Mutton reporting a definite change in beer drinking habits in recent times.

“When I first started we still kept seven glasses (200ml) cold for beer – there was one set of schooners, one of sevens and the rest were middies,” he said.

“Now we don’t even keep sevens and we have one set of middies and six sets of schooners.”

Romano’s largely attracts a younger clientele and Mr Mutton said schooners reigned supreme among that crowd.

But the appreciation for the middy in Wagga is still alive and well – it just depends on where you go.

At the Union Club Hotel, middies are even more popular, accounting for two in every five beers sold, according to licensee Rob Norris.

“We’d probably do 60 per cent schooners and 40 per cent middies,” he said.

“In our glass chillers at the moment we’ve got eight racks of middies and eight racks of schooners.”

TIME-HONOURED: Is the humble middy disappearing from Wagga? Not quite yet – William Farrer Hotel employee Alex Robertson still serves plenty of beer in the 285ml glass. Picture: Addison Hamilton

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南京夜网 21/04/2019

Sailors head to home port

AGE is wearying them, but former crew members of HMAS Wagga are summoning strength for another reunion at their “home port.”
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A major talking point of members of the HMAS Wagga Association at the reunion will be their long campaign to have another warship proudly carry the name of NSW’s largest city.

The last HMAS Wagga was a corvette built in 1942 for service during World War II.

She was paid off on October 28, 1960.

Former navy warrant officer David Williams will be among about 40 people who will attend the 2013 reunion from April 23 to 26.

For the past several biennial reunions, the association has feared each would be the last as their group aged and dwindled in number.

The same fear exists for this gathering.

“Sadly, as with most of the other corvette associations, most of the wartime crew members are no longer with us,” said Mr Williams, who joined HMAS Wagga in 1958 as a 17-year-old and was on her last voyage two years later.

“This year may be our last reunion.

“The only way the association can carry on is for the navy to name another ship ‘Wagga’.

“Sadly, this is not likely to happen as we have been petitioning for years to no effect.”

Member for Wagga Daryl Maguire is a strong supporter of the association and has began fighting for Wagga’s name to be adorned on another warship since he was first elected.

Yesterday, he was more optimistic than Mr Williams that the campaign would succeed.

He said his initial submission was regularly updated with the navy historian.

“The issue now is the (federal) government has not built any ships,” Mr Maguire said.

“It is something I am not giving up on, but it depends on the government acquiring ships.”

Navy tradition is that for a ship to be named HMAS Wagga it would have to be about the same sized ship.

The HMAS Wagga Association’s 2013 reunion dinner is being called “the last hurrah” and will be held in the Wagga RSL Club on April 24.

A mayoral reception will be held at 10am the same day in the Civic Centre where a HMAS Wagga display is kept, including the ship’s restored white sea ensign flown during her last voyage.

Members of the association will also march in Wagga’s Anzac Day parade.

Over the past year, the association’s president, Larry Horton, and secretary Nev (Lofty) Rackemann have died.

Only about 10 members of the war time crew are still alive.

HMAS Wagga

– One of 60 Bathurst class corvettes built during World War II.

– Launched in 1942 and entered service in January, 1943.

– Overall length 160 feet; beam 31 feet; standard displacement 650 tons; maximum speed 15 knots; crew 98.

– World War II service included escorting convoys along the east coast of Australia.

-Escort duties extended to New Guinea forward areas in March,1943.

– Came under attack from Japanese dive bombers in Milne Bay in April, 1943.

– Steamed 304,000 kilometres between 1943 and 1960.

– Service after the war included being a training ship.

– Paid off on October 28, 1960, making her the last and longest-serving corvette in the history of the Royal Australian Navy.

FINAL JOURNEY: HMAS Wagga sails into Sydney Harbour at the end of her last journey.

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南京夜网 21/04/2019

Smokers’ legal haze

LAWN BOWLS
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WAGGA lawn bowlers are scratching their heads over new legislation governing where they can and can’t smoke.

The NSW government regulations, which came into effect last month, rule smoking is prohibited in “a spectator area at a sports ground or other recreational area being used for an organised sporting event”.

However, the amendments to the Smoke-Free Environment Act (2000) do not stipulate the laws on smoking when standing on the playing surface, or while participating in the event.

Wagga RSL Club general manager Andrew Bell says the new laws only confuse smokers and bowlers alike.

“It’s a strange one,” Bell said. “If you stand on the edge of the bowling green you can smoke, but if you stand just off it you can’t.

“It seems stupid.”

Bowls NSW has indicated to clubs it will not be enforcing any of its own regulations on smoking to bowlers.

Instead, it will leave the decision up to the individual club whether it wants to ban smoking from the playing surface or allow players to make the decision for themselves.

“We have basically left it up to our bowlers,” Bell said. “We always discourage people from smoking on our greens but we don’t have any rules against it.

“It’s such a hard one to police with the laws the way they are.”

The Tobacco Legislation Amendment Bill (2012) refers generally to all sports when mentioning grounds and spectator areas.

The Daily Advertiser contacted the Wagga Country Club yesterday to get its view on smoking on the golf courses but a spokesperson not be contacted.

The bill also bans smoking “within 4 metres of a pedestrian access point to a building” and Bell is equally confused about that ruling.

“You have seen our club…where is the entrance?” he said. “Is it from the street or our front door?”

The Rules Club was also unable to be contacted yesterday for comment.

NEW LAWS: New legislation governing where lawn bowlers can and cannot smoke is causing confusion in Wagga.

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南京夜网 21/04/2019

Cavanough pays for positive swab

RACING
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LEADING Albury trainer Brett Cavanough has been fined $4000 for a positive swab dating back to October last year.

Cavanough yesterday fronted a stewards inquiry at Murrumbidgee Turf Club where he pleaded guilty to administering a sheep drench to Frog Hollow two days prior to its win at Albury in October.

In a hearing that lasted more than two hours, Cavanough admitted that he administered sheep worm control product Levamisole Gold to Frog Hollow that was found upon analysis to contain prohibited substance Tetramisole.

Stewards fined Cavanough $4000 but took into account that Tetramisole and Levamisole were only added to the list of prohibited substances on June 1, 2011.

Cavanough yesterday explained to The Daily Advertiser that he was not aware the worm control product was a banned substance.

“The stewards have got a job to do and I got a fair decision,” Cavanough said yesterday.

“It probably needs to be brought to the attention of trainers that they have to be careful with the dry drenches you give your horses because some substances are not registered by Racing NSW.

“This was an old farmers’ worm drench that my grandfather used and now it’s illegal in racing basically.

“Everyone has a job to do. I’ve done the wrong thing and got a kick up the backside.”

The positive swab was found in a subsequent urine sample taken from Frog Hollow when it won the Benchmark 55 Handicap (1000m) at Albury on Saturday, October 27.

Acting under the rules, stewards disqualified Frog Hollow from its first placing and subsequently awarded the race to Russwillcrow, with Stage Snippets and Kenjockety being promoted to second and third placings respectively.

Stewards also fined Cavanough another $200 for failing to record the administration of Levamisole Gold to Frog Hollow in his treatment records.

The fines would come as a welcome relief to Cavanough, who has never previously had his licence suspended or disqualified.

He was issued a $6000 fine back in 2007 for a positive swab to banned substance dexamethasone but has established a record over the past decade as one of country NSW’s leading trainers.

Cavanough was advised of his rights to appeal but yesterday revealed he would accept the stewards’ decision.

FINED: Albury trainer Brett Cavanough fronts a Southern District stewards inquiry at Murrumbidgee Turf Club yesterday. Cavanough was fined $4000 due to a positive swab in October last year. Picture: Les Smith

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南京夜网 22/03/2019

Friends, family pay tribute to Genelle

THE impact Genelle Mullins had on the Wagga community could be seen yesterday as more than 1500 people celebrated her memory at St Michael’s Cathedral.
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Genelle died last Thursday in the intensive care unit of Wagga Base Hospital.

Before her death she made the wish that her last words were read at her funeral.

And in those words she talked about her adoration for her five children, her great experiences working in the city and her love for singing.

But she also explained that she suffered “great grief” following the death of her mother and found herself on a rollercoaster of sadness she was unable to get off.

Her final request was for everyone to party in her memory because “she loved to party”.

In a fitting tribute to an extremely talented woman who loved to perform, family and friends gave a standing ovation that lasted for minutes during the service.

During the eulogies, husband Geoff Crouch described the happiest seven years of his life with her.

“She had five magnificent kids that she was so, so proud of and she would shout it from the rooftops,” he said.

“The greatest gift I will ever have is the knowledge she truly and deeply loved me and I loved her.”

Involved in dozens of committees, charities and community initiatives, Genelle was known for her tireless efforts to make Wagga – and the world – a better place.

Long-time friend Christine Nielsen talked about her generous personality.

“She gave 110 per cent every single time, never for any personal reward, never to receive any thank-yous but to make a difference,” she said.

Daughter Emma, 26, also gave a touching account of her mother, who she said did everything to ensure her children were given an amazing life, full of opportunity.

“She was reliable, loving, selfless and wise,” she said.

The memorial service was one of the largest held in Wagga in recent years.

MISSED SO MUCH: More than 1500 people attended the memorial mass held for Genelle Mullins (inset) at St Michael’s Cathedral yesterday. Picture: Addison Hamilton

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南京夜网 22/03/2019

Plane pain over hotel stay

CLAIMS of unreasonable hotel policies during one of Temora’s busiest weekends of the year have left tourists and the mayor disappointed.
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Temora Aviation Museum’s Warbirds Downunder 2013 event is estimated to attract up to 12,000 people to the Riverina in November.

Tickets aren’t even on sale yet but self-professed “serious fan” Ben Longden called to arrange accommodation this week.

The Echuca resident said he felt concerned by the fact there was a four-night minimum stay at the Temora Motel and that it could be happening elsewhere.

Mr Longden said he didn’t have an issue with increasing prices during peak periods, but when it was only a one-day event four nights seemed excessive.

“This is an increase of 400 per cent on a single night’s accommodation,” he said.

“I feel like it’s taking advantage of the world’s greatest aviation museum.”

Mr Longden said he was now staying somewhere out of town even though he wanted to support Temora business and has been doing so on regular visits for years.

When contacted about the issue, Temora Motel’s Irene Broad said it was normal for them to put in place a minimum-night stay policy during busy periods.

“This is a common policy found across motels both locally and internationally,” she said in a statement.

“It ensures that customers have a security in their booking as motels can easily book out 12 months in advance during peak periods in town.

“The visitors are therefore benefiting from their security and the town’s overall business and tourism economy is boosted.

“We would like to see tourists staying longer and enjoying the shopping, food, and overall hospitality of Temora.”

Chief executive of Temora Aviation Museum Kenny Love said motels had the right to run their business as they saw fit, but he was disappointed if visitors to the museum were frustrated.

“I only found out about some motels charging a four-night minimum yesterday and I am disappointed it is taking place,” he said.

“It is a select number of motels and it is disappointing because we work very hard to get people to Temora and spend a lot of time and resources advertising and promoting Temora and the Temora Aviation Museum.

“Warbirds Downunder is a very popular event and visitors shouldn’t be discouraged as there are plenty of accommodation options available other than motels such as homestays, B&Bs and plenty of available camping space.”

Temora’s mayor Rick Firman also chose the word “disappointed” to express his feelings about the issue.

“If it was the case we would be extremely disappointed because of all the hard work council has done with tourism,” he said.

“I believe the vast majority would keep their policies the same and be fine.”

Riverina Regional Tourism executive officer Linda Tillman declined to comment on the matter.

Temora Aviation Museum’s Warbirds Downunder 2013 event is expected to draw a large crowd but aircraft enthusiasts already have concerns about accommodation demands.

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南京夜网 22/03/2019

TV, crime docos helping criminals avoid detection: police

TELEVISION shows and documentaries depicting crime scenes could be helping Ballarat’s criminals avoid detection, police say.
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The comments by Ballarat’s divisional Superintendent Andrew Allen come as The Courier obtained “cleared crime” police statistics for the last financial year, revealing the rates of solved crime throughout the 2011-12 reporting period.

Police define cleared crime as when an offender is charged, cautioned, the complaint is withdrawn, no offence is detected or when an offender is too young to charge.

Just 84 out of 752 reported home burglaries were cleared by police in the 2011-12 financial year.

Superintendent Allen said the low return could be attributed to a combination of factors, and stressed that outstanding crimes can still be cleared by police in the next reporting period.

He said one possible reason for the discrepancy could be the prevalence of crime-scene procedure depicted in documentaries and dramas on television – primarily coming from the United States.

“There’s no doubt these (shows) are educating criminals of today and of the future, in my opinion,” he said.

“Its a whole combination of things . . . but with the discussions and experience we’ve got around the investigation table in Ballarat, it would be not unreasonable to say that’s part of it.”

Superintendent Allen said repeat, or recidivist, offenders also “debrief” one another in prison, learning more about police methods each time they are arrested.

“Going back to my days in crime squads, when we charged serious offenders and they’d be remanded into prison, they would debrief each other as to how they were caught, how they were interviewed, how they managed to give either false confessions or false alibis,” he said.

“Once someone goes into the system, cases, methods, modus operandi are discussed with others and comparisons are made – that’s done with all levels of crime.”

While a low percentage of residential burglaries were cleared inside of the 2011-2012 financial year, 66 of 69 reports of drug manufacture, cultivate and trafficking in Ballarat were cleared in the same period.

Superintendent Allen said the 95 per cent success rate was evidence that targeted operations by Ballarat’s Divisional Response Unit, among others, was having a big effect on the city’s drug scene.

DRU Senior Sergeant Darren Tanis said his unit had recently established a Police Recidivist Offender Team, which specifically targets identified youth and adult recidivist offenders committing offences across the Ballarat police division.

He also said drug traffickers would continue to be a focus for the DRU.

“We will continue to target individuals and groups within Ballarat who traffick drugs into our most vulnerable community members,” he said.

Superintendent Allen said police were adopting a holistic approach to improving community safety in 2013, with detectives, front-line police, covert operatives and members from the Highway Patrol all focusing on repeat offenders.

“We’re responding more with vehicles and on foot – we’re doing as much as we can to put ourselves out there in the community,” he said.

“The community deserves the best service we can provide and if anyone sees somebody committing offences, then we ask people to just make that phone call and we will respond.”

Superintendent Allen said more police would join Ballarat’s growing ranks in 2013 and said the new Ballarat North police station would become operational mid-year.

Other cleared crime statistics include almost 60 per cent of assaults cleared, more than 63 per cent of all rapes cleared and almost 70 per cent of all robberies cleared in 2011-2012.

Home burglaries: prevention tips

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南京夜网 22/03/2019

CFA conducts mock industrial rescue in Delacombe

FRED the unfortunate window washer has been rescued for the second time in as many weeks after getting stuck up an industrial building in Delacombe.
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Ballarat City Fire Brigade again used the Friendly Rescue Extrication Dummy to train its members in high-angle rescues atop tall structures yesterday.

The training comes as Ballarat braces for a run of hot weather, with residents urged to make sure they are prepared for bushfires.

A Total Fire Ban is in place for Ballarat and the central district today, with temperatures expected to hit 33 degrees.

A top of 32 degrees is predicted for Thursday and 29 degrees for Friday.

Fire Services Commissioner Craig Lapsley said the peak of the fire season had only just begun in Victoria.

“Traditionally, we know that February is a bad month for fires,” he said.

“The forecast for the coming days is for hot, dry weather with the Fire Danger Ratings either Severe or Very High. In these types of conditions, if a fire starts, and takes hold, it may be uncontrollable.”

Mr Lapsley said extremely dry conditions in January, with only 1.8mm of rain recorded in Ballarat, had contributed to the fire risk.

Ballarat City Fire Brigade Station Officer Scott Gambino said local firefighters were working hard to stay sharp.

“At this time of year, we’re pretty busy with bush and grass fires but there’s still these areas where we need to maintain our skills,” he said of this week’s training drill.

Last week, firefighters jumped off the roof of Central Square car park to rescue Fred in another rescue simulation.

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Leading Firefighter Jarrod Howlett and firefighter Darryl Longhurst with Fred the dummy during a rescue exercise at Joe White Malting in Delacombe yesterday.

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南京夜网 22/03/2019

Ballarat road fatalities fall in 2012

Police have praised Ballarat’s drivers after the release of official road toll statistics yesterday.
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Just two fatalities were recorded in Ballarat for the 2012 calendar year, down from three in 2011.

By comparison, 16 road deaths were recorded in Geelong during 2012.

The Ballarat Highway Patrol has conducted regular operations over the past 12 months, including ongoing operations which target speed, drink-driving and mobile phone offences.

Operations such as Operation Surprise, where officers hide behind trees and radio ahead to waiting police cars about drivers they’ve observed on their phones, have been very successful.

The visiting Automated Number Plate Recognition System, which instantly identifies unregistered vehicles, has also been prolific in Ballarat during 2012.

Statewide, Victoria lost 282 lives on the roads in 2012 – five less than in 2011.

This year’s toll is the fifth consecutive record low and marks the seventh year in a row where the road toll has continued to drop.

Despite the positive trend, Assistant Commissioner for Road Policing Robert Hill said there were five lives lost last weekend and it was a real reminder that Victorians couldn’t take their minds off road safety for a second.

“While a fifth consecutive record low road toll is something the community should be congratulated for, we can never rest on our laurels and need to strive for no deaths on Victorian roads,” Mr Hill said.

“Almost 21 per cent of people killed on our roads last year were aged between 18 and 24.” The statistics show 152 deaths were recorded on roads in country Victoria, while 129 fatalities occurred in Melbourne.

While young people aged between 18 and 24 made up the largest group represented in road deaths (21 per cent), there is a growing trend in the number of older drivers losing their lives on Victorian roads.

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